Document Type

Article

Publication Title

Entertainment and Sports Law

Department

Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences Department

ISSN

1748-944X

Volume

6

Issue

1

DOI

10.16997/eslj.63

First Page

1

Last Page

11

Publication Date

June 2008

Abstract

Statements found in the NCAA Manual and made by the NCAA President emphasize the primacy of academic success for college athletes. However the reality of a ‘meaningful education’ is often elusive due to the multitude of competing interests. College athletes must balance academic success with the extensive time demands of athletic competition, practice, travel, conditioning, watching game film, etc. Often, this balancing act proves unsuccessful insofar as it pertains to the achievement of educational goals. To date, there has been little legal recourse available for aggrieved college athletes who wish to argue that they have been unfairly deprived of the opportunity for a meaningful education. Educational malpractice lawsuits have been unsuccessful and contractual recourse for students has been limited to cases in which specific promises have been breached by a university. The authors argue, however, that college athletes should be able to rely upon a university’s good faith efforts to provide a meaningful education. If a university fails to act in good faith a cause of action based on a breach of the duty of good faith and fair dealing should be available to the college athlete.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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