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Date of Award

2015

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Matthew Normand

First Committee Member

Carolynn Kohn

Second Committee Member

Pamela Neidert

Abstract

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend children engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for 60 minutes every day, however, most children in the United States do not meet this recommendation. Previous research has demonstrated MVPA is functionally related to activity contexts. Moreover, the presence of peers may influence MVPA, however this has not been experimentally demonstrated. The purpose of the current study was to experimentally manipulate group composition and assess its influence on children’s MVPA. A second purpose was to assess the influence of activity contexts on MVPA. Results indicated no differences between group and solitary conditions. However, responding did vary within activity contexts. Additionally, MVPA was highest during the fixed-equipment phase.

Pages

69

ISBN

9781339027418

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