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Date of Award

2015

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

International Studies

First Advisor

Chris Cartwright

First Committee Member

Miriam Sobre-Denton

Second Committee Member

Michael Vande Berg

Abstract

More students at college and universities are taking advantage of the opportunity to study abroad. During their time overseas, many will confront culture shock. Upon their return, they may also encounter a difficult transition, resulting in reverse culture shock. This study explores the various long term effects of reverse culture shock among study abroad alumni at a land grant institution. The alumni in this sample represent a variety of study abroad programs as well as experiences with reentry shock. By contributing further evidence regarding the influence of reverse culture shock over an extended period, it can provide incentive for universities to increase the level of reentry support for their students. Furthermore, by assisting students through the challenges of their reentry, educators can enhance the level of cultural learning from the experience as well as contribute to the students’ personal development.

Pages

89

ISBN

9781339270258

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