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Date of Award

2014

Document Type

Dissertation - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Educational Administration and Leadership

First Advisor

Justin Low

First Committee Member

Bhaskara Jasti

Second Committee Member

Rachelle Hackett

Third Committee Member

Amy Scott

Fourth Committee Member

Linda Webster

Abstract

The ADHD symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity have detrimental effects on children's social functioning and increase their risk of being victimized by peers and engaging in bullying behaviors (Unnever & Cornell, 2003;Wiener & Mak, 2009). In particular, the specific social skills of peer competence and self-control were examined to determine if there was a mediating or indirect effect on peer victimization or engagement in bullying behaviors. Participants in this study included 707 children from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and variables were measured in the 3 rd , 5 th , and 6 th grades. Results indicated no direct effects between hyperactive/impulsive symptoms and peer victimization or engagement in bullying. However, a significant indirect effect between hyperactive/impulsive symptoms in the 3 rd grade and peer victimization in the 6 th grade via peer competence in the 5 th grade was found. Evidence of an indirect effect between hyperactive/impulsive symptoms and peer victimization via self-control skills was also found. A significant relationship between hyperactive/impulsive symptoms and engagement in bullying through peer competence was not found. Finally, results suggested a significant indirect effect between hyperactive/impulsive symptoms and engagement in bullying behavior through self-control skills.

Pages

87

ISBN

9781303996788

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