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Date of Award

2010

Document Type

Dissertation - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Educational Administration and Leadership

First Advisor

Antonio Serna

First Committee Member

Dennis Brennan

Second Committee Member

Chet Jensen

Third Committee Member

Michael Elium

Abstract

The problem. Research indicates that Latino English language learners in California are placed in special education classes at a higher rate than other states. The factors that determine placement of Latino English learners such as language barriers, transiency, poverty, and teacher training may create challenges for Directors of Special Education. Purpose. This study examined the factors that may contribute to the placement of Latino English language learners in special education as perceived by Directors of Special Education. Research questions. This study answered two questions: (1) Do Directors of Special Education in California believe that there is an overrepresentation of Latino English language learners in special education? (2) What do Directors of Special Education perceive are the factors that lead to the placement of Latino English language learners in special education classes? Methodology. This study used a non-descriptive design and surveyed Directors of Special Education in California districts with an average daily attendance (ADA) of 10,000 or more students. Data for this study was analyzed using percentages, frequencies, mean, and Chi-Square. Ninety-eight Directors of Special Education in districts of ten thousand or more ADA were emailed a questionnaire through SurveyMonkey, and twenty-seven responded. Significant findings. The results suggest that Directors of Special Education do not believe that there is an overrepresentation of Latino English language learners in special education. The results of the survey found six factors that exhibited a significant proportion of positive responses. Recommendations for practice and future studies are also included.

Pages

72

ISBN

9781109733044

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