University of the Pacific
 

Location

Room R107 in The Rotunda, School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, University of the Pacific, Stockton campus

Start Date

1-11-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

1-11-2016 1:00 PM

Description

Function and modulation of neuronal sodium channels are critical for the neuromodulation of electrical excitability and synaptic transmission in neurons - the basis for many aspects of signal transduction, learning, memory and physiological regulation. Mutations in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel genes are responsible for various human neurological disorders. Furthermore, human neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels are primary targets of therapeutic drugs used as local anesthetics and for treatment of neurological and cardiac disorders. Yarov-Yarovoy's lab is working on rational design of novel therapeutically useful blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels for treatment of pain and epilepsy. Serious, chronic pain affects at least 116 million Americans each year and epilepsy affects nearly 3 million Americans and 50 million people Worldwide. However, the treatment of chronic pain and epilepsy remains a major unmet medical need because the use of currently available drugs is limited due to incomplete efficacy and/or significant side effects. Considerable efforts by pharmaceutical industry toward identifying selective inhibitors of one or more of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes did not generate any genuinely subtype selective blockers. Yarov-Yarovoy's laboratory uses an innovative approach to design novel subtype selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocking peptides, small molecules, and antibodies. This project will provide key structural information on the molecular basis of neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels function and its interaction with therapeutically useful subtype-specific modulators.

Presenter Bio

Dr. Vladimir Yarov-Yarovoy will speak about his approach to designing drugs to treat neurological disorders using cutting-ede computational methods. Yarov-Yarovoy is an associate professor in the Department of Physiology and Membrane Biology at U.C. Davis School of Medicine.

Click here to view additional information on Dr. Yarov-Yarovoy on his profile page

Host

Carlos Villalba-Galea

 
Nov 1st, 12:00 PM Nov 1st, 1:00 PM

Design of novel ion channel modulators

Room R107 in The Rotunda, School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, University of the Pacific, Stockton campus

Function and modulation of neuronal sodium channels are critical for the neuromodulation of electrical excitability and synaptic transmission in neurons - the basis for many aspects of signal transduction, learning, memory and physiological regulation. Mutations in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel genes are responsible for various human neurological disorders. Furthermore, human neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels are primary targets of therapeutic drugs used as local anesthetics and for treatment of neurological and cardiac disorders. Yarov-Yarovoy's lab is working on rational design of novel therapeutically useful blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels for treatment of pain and epilepsy. Serious, chronic pain affects at least 116 million Americans each year and epilepsy affects nearly 3 million Americans and 50 million people Worldwide. However, the treatment of chronic pain and epilepsy remains a major unmet medical need because the use of currently available drugs is limited due to incomplete efficacy and/or significant side effects. Considerable efforts by pharmaceutical industry toward identifying selective inhibitors of one or more of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes did not generate any genuinely subtype selective blockers. Yarov-Yarovoy's laboratory uses an innovative approach to design novel subtype selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocking peptides, small molecules, and antibodies. This project will provide key structural information on the molecular basis of neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels function and its interaction with therapeutically useful subtype-specific modulators.