Title

Catalytic Transformations by Weakly Interacting Dicopper Complexes

Poster Number

9

Lead Author Affiliation

Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences

Lead Author Status

Doctoral Student

Second Author Affiliation

Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences

Second Author Status

Faculty

Introduction

Several mononuclear catalyst have been well studied and shown to catalyze various organic reactions. Isolated metal intermediates provide information regarding the catalytic cycle. Recently, chemists have attempted to use synthesized bimetallic complexes to catalyze similar reactions. The intermediates involved in these processes however have proven to be quite elusive.

Purpose

This work aims to target reactive intermediates involved in catalysis to study the role of an added metal atom in catalytic transformations. Indirect evidence of these reactive species can be provided through well studied catalytic reactions. The previously syntheized dicopper formamidinate complexes have been shown to catalytically decompose several diazo compounds at room temperature. This suggests the formation of a dicopper carbene. Although there have been few reports of dicopper carbenes, they are not responsible for the catalysis. Through catalytic cyclopropanation and aziridination of alkenes, we hope to provide evidence for reactive dicopper carbenes and nitrenes.

Method

Dicopper formamidinate complexes were synthesized in a nitrogen glovebox. They were characterized by X-Ray crystallography, NMR, and DART-MS. The catalysis was performed in the glovebox. Catalysis products were screened by DART-MS, identified further by GC-MS, and quantitative analysis was performed by GC-FID.

Results

Preliminary results indicate successful catalytic cyclopropanation and aziridination of styrene via reactive dicopper intermediates. Catalysis conditions are optimized by varying solvent, catalyst load, and substrate concentrations.

Significance

This work features a dicopper complex that is capable of catalytic transformations. The catalysis suggests the need for dicopper carbenes and nitrenes which are quite rare. future work includes attempts to isolate or detect these elusive intermediates.

Location

DUC Ballroom A&B

Format

Poster Presentation

Poster Session

Morning

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

Catalytic Transformations by Weakly Interacting Dicopper Complexes

DUC Ballroom A&B

Several mononuclear catalyst have been well studied and shown to catalyze various organic reactions. Isolated metal intermediates provide information regarding the catalytic cycle. Recently, chemists have attempted to use synthesized bimetallic complexes to catalyze similar reactions. The intermediates involved in these processes however have proven to be quite elusive.