Title

The role of a novel muscle in the larynx of the túngara frog (Engystomops pustulosus)

Lead Author Affiliation

Biological Sciences

Introduction

Simple behaviors facilitate the study of the evolution of complex traits by making changes easily detectable. Like humans, frogs vocalize by forcing pulmonary air through the larynx, where two vocal cords vibrate passively to produce sound. Unlike humans, however, frogs lack muscles inside the laryngeal cavity and their four known laryngeal muscles are external to the arytenoid cartilages. Most frogs produce simple repetitive mating calls but túngara frogs can add a facultative second sound that involves vibrating a pair of laryngeal fibrous masses.

Location

DUC Ballroom A&B

Format

Poster Presentation

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Apr 30th, 1:00 PM Apr 30th, 3:30 PM

The role of a novel muscle in the larynx of the túngara frog (Engystomops pustulosus)

DUC Ballroom A&B

Simple behaviors facilitate the study of the evolution of complex traits by making changes easily detectable. Like humans, frogs vocalize by forcing pulmonary air through the larynx, where two vocal cords vibrate passively to produce sound. Unlike humans, however, frogs lack muscles inside the laryngeal cavity and their four known laryngeal muscles are external to the arytenoid cartilages. Most frogs produce simple repetitive mating calls but túngara frogs can add a facultative second sound that involves vibrating a pair of laryngeal fibrous masses.