Title

Interleukin-1beta as biomarker of periodontal reaction in teeth moved by Invisalign

Poster Number

31

Lead Author Affiliation

Dugoni School of Dentistry, Orthodontics

Additional Authors

Arief Halim, Melanie Seto, Sara Moazzami, Walied Touni, Elyse Garibaldi, Iroshini Perera, HeeSoo Oh, Mohamed Fallah, and Robert Boyd

Introduction

Chewing of food requires not only a stability of teeth, but also a plasticity of their position in the alveolar bone. Both functions are provided by periodontal ligament (PDL). Application of orthodontic force on a tooth leads to injury of PDL that reacts by a sterile inflammatory reaction. One of the earliest detectable biomarkers is interleukin- 1beta (IL-1b).

Purpose

The aim of our study was to determine, if changes of IL-1b concentration could be detected in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of the teeth moved by Invisalign.

Method

GCF was collected from twenty teeth at baseline before treatment, on the 1st and the 14th day of the first aligner, on the 14th day of the third aligner, on the 1st and the 14th day of the fifth aligner wear. Periostrips (Oraflow) were used for collection of GCF and volume of GCF was measured using Periotron (Oraflow). IL-1b concentrations were measured by ELISA (Ray Biotech). The baseline value was subtracted from the values measured during treatment. Significance of differences between means was determined using paired t-test.

Results

In our preliminary study, we found that concentration of IL-1b was increased on the first day and decreased towards the 14th day of the first aligner wear.

Significance

It seems that IL-1b can be used as early biomarker of PDL reaction in biomechanical studies of teeth moved by Invisalign.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Format

Poster Presentation

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Apr 25th, 2:00 PM Apr 25th, 4:00 PM

Interleukin-1beta as biomarker of periodontal reaction in teeth moved by Invisalign

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Chewing of food requires not only a stability of teeth, but also a plasticity of their position in the alveolar bone. Both functions are provided by periodontal ligament (PDL). Application of orthodontic force on a tooth leads to injury of PDL that reacts by a sterile inflammatory reaction. One of the earliest detectable biomarkers is interleukin- 1beta (IL-1b).