Title

Tigers Step Up! to Create a Campus of Active Bystanders

Poster Number

3

Lead Author Affiliation

Student Conduct & Community Standards

Introduction

Sexual assaults on college campuses in the U.S. continue to receive a lot of attention in the media, from educators, and from policy makers. When students feel safe on campus they're more likely to engage in behaviors associated with positive educational outcomes, including attending class regularly, being involved in campus life, and achieving their educational goals. Most sexual assaults on a college campus occur between people who know each other and when alcohol is involved. Students may be aware of a potential or in-progress sexual assault, but may also be reluctant to intervene to stop it. Reasons for for not intervening include fear of being rejected by peers, of retribution and retaliation, and fear that they have misjudged the situation. Helping students better understand bystander behavior and its consequences, warning signs of a problem, and concrete strategies for action can help overcome some of the fears associated with intervening.

Purpose

The purpose of this project was to assess the effectiveness of the Tigers Step Up! bystander intervention training program at University of the Pacific.

Method

Tigers Step Up! (bystander intervention training) sessions were held with various student groups at Pacific. Pre-tests were administered immediately prior to the educational intervention; post-tests were administered immediately following the intervention. These tests were designed to identify changes in reported self-efficacy, knowledge related to bystander intervention, and ability to apply skills learned. Over 300 undergraduates at the university participated. The pre-test was comprised of 19 questions; the post-test had 24 questions, which included additional items related to a case study. Questions on the tests were open-ended and yielded qualitative data. The data were analyzed and coded for emerging themes. A follow up survey was distributed via email to participants in the semester following the initial intervention.

Results

As evidenced in the post-test responses, students were able to successfully apply knowledge from the intervention (training) to the case presented. Results from the follow up survey indicate that when students faced a potentially difficult, real-life situation they had the knowledge and skills to intervene successfully; additionally students indicated that the training was valuable and should be offered again to other students.

Significance

Bystander intervention has been recognized as one of the most effective methods to combat sexual assault and other harmful behaviors on college campuses. At the same time, students are reluctant to intervene due to social pressures and fear of retribution. Helping students develop strategies to intervene in a problematic situation increases their confidence and willingness to step iip, which can lead to subsequent reductions in harmful behaviors.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Format

Poster Presentation

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Apr 25th, 10:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

Tigers Step Up! to Create a Campus of Active Bystanders

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Sexual assaults on college campuses in the U.S. continue to receive a lot of attention in the media, from educators, and from policy makers. When students feel safe on campus they're more likely to engage in behaviors associated with positive educational outcomes, including attending class regularly, being involved in campus life, and achieving their educational goals. Most sexual assaults on a college campus occur between people who know each other and when alcohol is involved. Students may be aware of a potential or in-progress sexual assault, but may also be reluctant to intervene to stop it. Reasons for for not intervening include fear of being rejected by peers, of retribution and retaliation, and fear that they have misjudged the situation. Helping students better understand bystander behavior and its consequences, warning signs of a problem, and concrete strategies for action can help overcome some of the fears associated with intervening.