Title

Active Engineering Education Modules: A Summary of Recent Research Findings

Poster Number

2

Lead Author Affiliation

Mechanical Engineering

Additional Authors

Jiancheng Liu, Kathy S. Jackson, Chuan-Chiang Chen, Firas Akasheh, Michael Orr, Kevin L. Webster, George Turvey and Mouchimi Bhattacharyya

Introduction

Contemporary engineering education is ever changing, adapting and evolving. As an example, finite element theory and application has in the past been included in graduate-level courses in engineering programs, however, current industry needs bachelor's level engineering graduates with skills in applying this essential analysis and design technique.

Purpose

In response to the need to introduce undergrads to the finite element method as well as the need for engineering curricula to include more active learning, we have developed, implemented and assessed a suite of Active Learning Module (ALM). The ALMs are designed to improve student learning of difficult engineering concepts while students gain essential knowledge of finite element analysis.

Method

These ALMs are self contained learning packages which have been implemented to 1000 students at five engineering universities over the past five years. We have developed over twenty-eight of these ALMs covering many disciplines of engineering such as structures, heat transfer, vibrations, machine design, computational fluid dynamics, biomedical imaging to name a few.

Results

The findings in this paper include statistical results for each ALM which compare performance on pre- and post-learning module quizzes to gauge change in student knowledge related to the difficult engineering concepts that each module addresses. Statistical significant student performance gains provide evidence of module effectiveness. In addition, we present statistical comparisons between different personality types (based on Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, MBTI , subgroups0, different learning styles (based on Felder-Solomon ILS subgroups) and gender and ethnicity in regards to average gains each group of student have made on quiz performance.

Significance

This paper summarizes the results from three years of a Phase 2 NSF grant (2011-2012,2012-2013, and 2013-2014). Of particular significance is the student improvement in the pre -learning module versus post-learning module quiz scores. Specifically , these student improvements were 32.33% for academic year 2011-2012, 27.7% for academic year 2012-2013 and 49.26% for academic year 2013-2014.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Format

Poster Presentation

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Apr 25th, 2:00 PM Apr 25th, 4:00 PM

Active Engineering Education Modules: A Summary of Recent Research Findings

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Contemporary engineering education is ever changing, adapting and evolving. As an example, finite element theory and application has in the past been included in graduate-level courses in engineering programs, however, current industry needs bachelor's level engineering graduates with skills in applying this essential analysis and design technique.