Title

Consumption of high fructose and glucose impairs aortic function in female rats

Poster Number

11

Lead Author Affiliation

Physiology and Pharmacology

Introduction

Intake of high fructose, especially in soft drinks, has shown to contribute to variety of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity. The consumption of fructose, mainly from high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages, has significantly increased in the US during the past several years. HFCS is an end product of combination of glucose and fructose. To date little is known about the comparative effects of high fructose and high glucose on rat aortic vascular function.

Purpose

The objective of this study was to compare the effects of high glucose (HG) and high fructose (HF) (20% w/v in drinking water for 8 weeks) consumption on female rat aortic function.

Method

10 week old female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 3 groups, supplemented with 20% w/v glucose or fructose in drinking water for 8 weeks. Control group received no sugar supplement. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) to acetylcholine (ACh; 10-8 to 10-5M) and bradykinin (BK; 10-9 to 10-5 M) and endothelium-independent vasodilation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10-9 to 10-5 M) were measured in aortic rings pre-contracted with phenylephrine (PE) or U46619. Constrictor response curves to PE (10-8 to 10-5 M) were also generated.

Results

The EDV to ACh was preserved in both HF- and HG- groups. HF ingestion, but not HG, significantly decreased maximal relaxation to BK. The potency of endothelium-independent vasodilation to SNP was augmented in aortic rings from HG group. However, HF ingestion significantly attenuated the potency of relaxation to SNP. The PE-induced contraction was not changed in HF group, but it was decreased in aortic rings from HG-fed rats.

Significance

Our data suggest that an increase in the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO may in part contribute to the decreased PE contractile responsiveness in HG group. Furthermore, a decrease in the sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle to NO along with the impaired vasodilatory responses to BK in aortas of HF-fed rats suggest that fructose ingestion may have a higher impact in inducing aortic dysfunction compared to glucose ingestion (supported by NIDCR).

Location

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Format

Poster Presentation

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Consumption of high fructose and glucose impairs aortic function in female rats

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Intake of high fructose, especially in soft drinks, has shown to contribute to variety of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity. The consumption of fructose, mainly from high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages, has significantly increased in the US during the past several years. HFCS is an end product of combination of glucose and fructose. To date little is known about the comparative effects of high fructose and high glucose on rat aortic vascular function.